Shoreline of Infinity – spring ’17

Shoreline-Issue-7-Cover-1000wThis month marks the seventh of what’ll hopefully be a very long run of Shoreline of Infinity, Scotland’s finest (and only) science fiction magazine. And it’s an especially exciting issue, because I’m in it – twice!

I really love Shoreline, and not just because they bought my work. I’ve been going to their monthly open mic nights (now at Banshee Labyrinth – second Wednesday of the month) since last summer and I own all seven issues in print format. I’d subscribe, but I like the experience of picking them up in person!

Unlike a lot of magazines, they have a somewhat loose and open-minded definition of sci-fi, publishing stories all over what one might call the SF spectrum, generally with a focus on character drama and emotion rather than science, which I really appreciate.

They also publish an ongoing comic about the history of science fiction, called The Beachcomber, and a great column on Scottish sci-fi history entitled SF Caledonia which is always a fascinating read, plus interviews and a selection of book reviews.

Issue 7 features one of my short stories, plus my review of The Girl with Two Souls by Stephen Palmer.

It’s more than just a fiction magazine – it really is a magazine for the Scottish sci-fi fan community, and I can’t recommend it enough!

This quarter’s line-up:

The Walls of Tithonium Chasma by Tim Major – a bleak and rather cold story set on Mars, in a future harking back to classic sci-fi.

An Infinite Number of Me by Dan Grace – one of the more abstract, less conventional offerings, this one’s the kind of story that could be taken as a metaphor, up until the final lines.

Brother’s Keeper by Shannon Connor Winward – I’d call this a character drama with a side of SF, rather than SF with character drama. Despite the time travel involved, it feels very real, very down-to-earth.

Message in a Bottle by Davyne DeSye – I confess, I’m not sure what to make of this one. A short and strange piece, perhaps more of a prose poem than a short story, I look forward to re-reading it.

Anyone Can Ask About Enhancement by Terry Jackman – a chilling and perhaps darkly comic tale set in a Brave New World-esque future.

3.8 Missions by Katie Gray – here’s my story! I shan’t toot my own horn, but it involves mostly cyborgs.

Quantum Flush by Daniel Soule – a very silly and very funny time travel story, if a little heavy on potty humour for my taste.

Something Fishy by David L Clements – a strange and unpredictable story about a singing fish on an alien world.

This issue’s Beachcomber is short and irrevent history of Martians, from Edgar Rice Burroughs to Marvin, and it’s probably my favourite entry in the series to date. SF Caledonia covers 19th century novel That Very Mab by May Kendall and Andrew Lang, a fascinating and hard to classify book about Mab the fairy queen returning to Britain after a long sojourn in Samoa.

Issue 7 is dedicated to author and poetry Jane Yolen and features an extended interview followed by a selection of her sci-fi poetry (with an introduction by poetry editor Russell Jones). Finally, there’s Ruth EJ Booth’s regular column Noise and Sparks, which discuses Mervyn Peake and the importance of the arts in these interesting times.

It’s a really great and well-rounded magazine. You can pick up a digital copy through the Shoreline of Infinity website for £2.60 or a hard copy for £5.25, and you can also buy copies at their monthly Event Horizon sci-fi open mic for £5. Check it out, and read my story while you’re at it!

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under books

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s